Change is Good!

During Federalist 10, James Madison believes fractions must be minimized and idealistically eradicated from the United States to deter civil unrest. Because it is neither practical nor ethical to attempt to eliminate all factions because liberties would be destroyed, James Madison takes the realistic approach and states that the United States must deal with the “consequences” of factions effectively. However, I do not see these so called “consequences” of factions on having a negative impact on society. Due to people’s various philosophical and religious beliefs, there are often value clashes that cause civil and occasionally violent dispute. James Madison sees this as being a threat to society, whereas I see these disagreements and debates essential for the preservation of society. When people form factions to support or denounce a piece of legislation, it demonstrates to Congress and other officials that there is disagreement and, if the opposition is large enough, promotes change. The primary reason why fractions are essential is because without them, government would not keep up with the ever changing opinions of the American people and pass just legislation. Factions also deter a rebellion from happening. If issue specific fractions, like the ACLU and the NRA, do not form and do not express the opinions of its members, it would be extremely difficult for the government is survey American opinion on issues and could potentially pass bills that disregard current American wants and spark a rebellion.  Grant it, fractions cannot be violent and burn towns down; however, when fractions are civil they can be tools for the government to survey American opinion rather than a burden.

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~ by lhipple on October 23, 2009.

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